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January 2021

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Spain – renewables

The results of Spain’s auction this week for 3GW of renewables capacity have been widely welcomed by the country’s solar sector, but calls have been made to tweak future auctions to support smaller-scale projects as well as encourage the participation of bids with energy storage. The heavily oversubscribed auction saw PV bidders pick up 2,036MW of capacity, while 998MW was awarded for wind projects. The capacity obtained by PV bidders was divided into 66 lots and secured by 27 companies, with an average lot capacity of 30MW, showing the competitiveness in the country’s solar industry, according to trade association UNEF.

PV Tech 29th Jan 2021 read more »

Onshore wind energy scores lowest ever price through new Spanish auction The Spanish government completed its latest renewable energy auction this month, securing 3GW of new projects.

Business Green 29th Jan 2021 read more »

News

General Motors aims to become carbon neutral by 2040

General Motors (GM) will target carbon neutrality across its operations and products globally by 2040, while also committing to set science-based targets that would deliver net-zero emissions ten years later.

The company will offer 30 all-electric models globally, with EVs expected to account for 40% of US market entries by the end of 2025

The company will offer 30 all-electric models globally, with EVs expected to account for 40% of US market entries by the end of 2025

GM plans to become carbon neutral in its global products and operations by 2040 and will set science-based targets that are aligned to the net-zero trajectory for 2050. The company has also signed the Business Ambition Pledge for 1.5⁰C.

“General Motors is joining governments and companies around the globe working to establish a safer, greener and better world,” the company’s chief executive Mary Barra said. “We encourage others to follow suit and make a significant impact on our industry and on the economy as a whole.”

With GM’s products accounting for 75% of carbon emissions covered by the new commitment, the company will ramp up its electric vehicle (EV) portfolio.

The company will offer 30 all-electric models globally, with EVs expected to account for 40% of US market entries by the end of 2025.

Last year, GM committed $20bn on electrifying its vehicle portfolio by 2025. The company confirmed that new pure EVs will be launched by GM’s four biggest brands – Chevrolet, Cadillac, GMC and Buick – by the end of 2022. The first launches will be the Cadillac Lyriq, fully electric SUV, and an updated Bolt EV, under the Chevrolet brand. However, GM has confirmed that investment will be increased to £27bn by 2025.

Off the back of that announcement, edie spoke to GM’s chief sustainability officer Dane Parker. As part of the video interview, Parker explained how GM temporarily pivoted its manufacturing process to create protective equipment for frontline workers combatting Covid-19 and how the coronavirus could help shift the public perception towards the EV revolution. Watch the interview here.

As the 10th largest purchaser of renewable energy globally, GM will also increase clean energy uptake. The company will aim to source 100% renewable power for its owned sites globally by 2035 and by 2030 in the US – five years earlier than a previous target.

GM will also collaborate with suppliers to create targets for supply chain decarbonisation, improved transparency and sustainable sourcing. The company will also try to limit the number of offset credits used in decarbonisation plans.

Matt Mace

News

Green Homes Grant

The industry standards body for renewable energy installers is calling on the government to immediately rectify the failure to pay businesses for work on the green homes grant, which is leading, according to some companies, to rising debts and job losses. Installers of renewable energy systems have been left unpaid for several months by the government, the Guardian reported this week, while long delays were putting members of the public off the scheme. Ian Rippin, who leads the Microgeneration Certification Scheme (MCS), said he had since spoken to the government about the “numerous issues” that have come to light relating to the flagship £2bn green homes grant. The grants are intended to help the UK move to net zero carbon emissions by 2050 by providing financial help for householders to switch from fossil fuel systems to renewable energy. The grants – of £5,000 and £10,000 – also cover the installation of insulation to make homes more energy efficient.

Guardian 28th Jan 2021 read more »

News

Global carbon market grew 20% in 2020

The valuation of the global carbon market grew 20% in 2020, totalling almost €230bn and the fourth consecutive year of record growth, new research has found.

More than eight billion allowances changed hands through European markets in 2020, a near-20% increase on 2019 levels

More than eight billion allowances changed hands through European markets in 2020, a near-20% increase on 2019 levels

Refinitiv’s annual Carbon Market Year in Review found that emissions covered by trading schemes were valued at €229bn in 2020, a figure more than five times greater than levels recorded in 2017.

The research found that much of the 20% growth came from the European Emissions Trading System (EU ETS), which accounted for nearly 90% of global value. However, even greater levels of growth are on the horizon due to the impending net-zero commitments from both the US and China.

Refinitiv’s head of carbon research Hæge Fjellheim said: “It might seem counterintuitive that in a year when emissions dropped significantly due to the pandemic, carbon prices and global market value hit new records.”

“Pandemic-induced crash and ambition-induced boom is our headline explanation. Major carbon markets saw prices and volumes rise on expected tightening of emission caps due to more ambitious climate goals in the future.”

More than eight billion allowances changed hands through European markets in 2020, a near-20% increase on 2019 levels. This happened despite an estimated 14% emissions drop in the EU ETS sectors according to Refinitiv.

In the US, the Western Climate Initiative (WCI) and Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) markets followed a similar pattern to Europe. The WCI and RGGI grew by 16% from 2019, to €22bn and €1.7bn, respectively. With President Biden pledging to set a net-zero target and promote clean energy, the US carbon market is braced for a massive overhaul.

China has also pledged to deliver net-zero emissions by 2060 and the Government has drawn up plans for an emissions trading system (ETS). The plans passed legislation last week, allowing provincial governments to develop legally binding emissions caps for large power businesses.

Under the new rules, big and high-emitting businesses in the power sector can start trading emissions with each other from 1 February. Some 2,200 firms will be covered by the new system and. Each emits at least 26,000 tonnes of greenhouse gases annually.

Pilots of China’s ETS saw 98 million carbon allowances, collectively worth €272m, traded in 2019. In comparison, 78 million allowances were traded in 2018. China notably has the biggest fleet of coal power stations in the world, by number and generation capacity.

Refinitiv’s analyst for the Carbon Research China team Cathy Liao added: “China’s 2060 carbon neutrality pledge gave momentum to the preparations for a national carbon market. All the groundwork is in place for the world’s biggest emission trading system to finally see transactions, and we expect trading to start in the second quarter of 2021 at the latest.”

Last year, Refinitiv revealed that globally, turnover related to emissions trading rose 34% year-on-year in 2019 to reach €194bn (£163bn). On a global basis, it found that turnover in the carbon market in 2019 was five times greater than in 2017.

Taskforce on Scaling Voluntary Carbon Markets

In related news, a business-led taskforce has this week unveiled a new blueprint on creating a large-scale carbon trading market.

The Taskforce on Scaling Voluntary Carbon Markets was launched in September 2020 to take stock of existing voluntary offsetting schemes and identify key challenges to scaling them up while ensuring credibility and avoiding issues like double-counting.

Spearheaded by former Bank of England Governor Mark Carney, and backed by a host of private corporations, the Taskforce noted that the current market for offsets will need to grow by at least 15-fold by 2030 if the private sector is to align with the Paris Agreement’s 1.5C trajectory. By 2050, he warned, it may need to be up to 160 times bigger than in 2020, should corporates rely on offsetting rather than emissions reductions.

Mark Carney, UN Special Envoy for Climate Action and Finance, said: “Company net-zero transition plans must primarily depend on absolute emissions reductions. In parallel, a large, high-integrity market for carbon offsets is essential for three reasons.  First, some companies are committed to ‘reducing’ historic emissions, which can only be accomplished through offsets. Second, in hard-to-abate sectors, all the technologies do not yet exist to decarbonise completely, so companies will need to rely on offsets to limit their emissions while they transition to new, low-emission operating models.

“Third, carbon offsets can be used to buy down the ‘green premium’ on vital emerging technologies—such as hydrogen, direct air carbon capture and sustainable fuels—to accelerate their development and adoption. In order to conserve the world’s precious carbon budget and accelerate the transition to zero absolute emissions, we need a large, transparent, verifiable and robust voluntary carbon market. The Taskforce for Scaling Voluntary Carbon Markets blueprint sets out clearly how we can build this market. It is critical that we now move from blueprint to building as quickly as possible.”

Comprising more than 50 experts from six continents, the Taskforce has this week released 20 comprehensive actions to help shape the market at a pace consistent with the needs of the Paris Agreement.

Aside from helping businesses to meet their own commitments and to align with legally binding climate targets in the markets where they operate, it is hoped that the Taskforce will play a role in boosting carbon prices. As of October 2019, the average global carbon price was just $2 per tonne.

Matt Mace

News

Winterwatch

The BBC’s Winterwatch series has recorded what is thought to be a broadcasting first with the transmission of a 60 minute episode powered entirely by green hydrogen and batteries. The BBC announced today that a hydrogen generator has been deployed at Winterwatch’s outside broadcasting hub at BBC Bristol and is helping to replace the use of a diesel powered generator. Meanwhile, at the show’s presenter locations across the country the production team has installed batteries powered by intelligent hybrid generator systems which use spare energy to charge batteries, significantly minimising the use of diesel fuel and CO2 emissions.

Business Green 27th Jan 2021 read more »

News

COP26 President launches challenge to deliver net-zero ‘tipping points’ in every sector

The UN High-Level Climate Champions and COP26 President Alok Sharma have today (28 January) unveiled a radical new roadmap to push the global economy towards net-zero emissions, targeting a range of near-term, sectoral tipping points to deliver decarbonisation.

Currently, corporate commitments under the Race to Zero campaign cover more than 12% of the global economy and $9.8trn in revenue

Currently, corporate commitments under the Race to Zero campaign cover more than 12% of the global economy and $9.8trn in revenue

The Race to Zero Breakthroughs have been published in a special paper by the UN High-Level Climate Champions, COP26 President Alok Sharma, COP25 President Carolina Schmidt, and the UNFCCC’s Executive Secretary Patricia Espinosa at the World Economic Forum’s Davos Agenda. It will build on the Race to Zero campaign that was launched in June 2020.

The Breakthroughs outline how 20 sectors that make up the global economy, including finance, water, aviation and clean energy, can act on near-term tipping points to move towards net-zero emissions.

The paper articulates “what key actors must do, and by when, to deliver the systems change we need to achieve a resilient, zero-carbon world”. Specifically, the initiative is aiming to get “actors” that account for 20% of each sector to commit to a series of major breakthroughs, such as setting net-zero targets, ensuring the majority of sector energy use comes from renewables and creating capacity for certain green technologies such as hydrogen and zero-carbon facilities.

Actors range from supply-side companies such as manufacturers, demand-side companies like retailers, policymakers, financial institutions and the civil society. The initiative is aiming to get 10 sectors covered by a breakthrough by the time COP26 takes place in Glasgow this November.

COP26 President Designate Alok Sharma said: “It is vital that businesses go net-zero, as part of our fight against climate change. Which is why we look to all sectors to reach a point at which a clean way of operating becomes the norm. Because if every sector plays its part, we will see the global economy on the right path to achieving net-zero by 2050.”

Breakthrough breakdown

The paper notes that around two-thirds of global emissions are now covered by net-zero targets, which in turn can facilitate the creation of 35 million more jobs and $26trn in economic benefits compared to “attempting to resuscitate the high-carbon status quo”.

Currently, corporate commitments under the Race to Zero campaign cover more than 12% of the global economy and $9.8trn in revenue. Even while grappling with the coronavirus pandemic, net-zero commitments almost doubled in 2020.

The Race to Zero Breakthroughs have been drawn from the Climate Action Pathways roadmaps to reach the Paris Agreement. These were developed by the Marrakech Partnership.

One key member of this coalition is the Mission Possible Partnership. Some 400 heavy emitters from the transport and industrial sectors have formed the partnership aimed at accelerating the low-carbon transition, with financial backing from Amazon’s Jeff Bezos.

Airbus, BASF, Boeing, Cargill, easyJet, Heathrow Airport, Royal DSM, Royal Dutch Shell and Volvo are among the first corporate members of the Partnership. The financial sector is also represented through members including Citi and Lloyds Register.

Anthony Hobley, Executive Director of Mission Possible Partnership, said: “The Mission Possible Partnership is delighted to act as the delivery mechanism for Race to Zero Breakthroughs in sectors where emissions are still hard to abate. Beginning with seven of the most energy-intensive industries, the partnership’s work will build on growing momentum, investor pressure, consumer expectations, and analytical tools to design and execute net-zero pathways for those industries, their customers, their suppliers, and their capital providers.”

Matt Mace

News

Premier Inn to install EV chargers at 300 hotels

Whitbread-owned hotel chain Premier Inn is set to install electric vehicle (EV) chargers at some 300 of its locations, in what it’s calling the biggest roll-out of its kind in the UK hospitality sector.

Image: Premier Inn 

Image: Premier Inn 

The company has partnered with energy major ENGIE UK & Ireland and its charging point provider GeniePoint to install and power the chargers. It is targeting 600 charging points within the next three years, with the option to add up to 400 more in the longer-term.

ENGIE UK & Ireland, which is installing the chargers and has electricity tariff contracts with Premier Inn, claims that the chargers will enable the average electric car to charge within 30 minutes. They will be available to restaurant guests and members of the general public as well as hotel guests.

GeniePoint, meanwhile, operates the charge points and the network to which they are connected. Its pay-as-you-go model lets motorists pay online, via a smartphone app, or by using an RFID card. It costs 30p per kWh of charge to use GeniePoint. 

Whitbread’s group procurement director Simon Leigh said the chargers will help ease “range anxiety” for guests who either own electric cars or are looking to switch.

“Knowing that in many locations they will soon be able to arrive and have access to a high-speed charge point to quickly refuel their car while they relax and refuel themselves will be a great source of comfort,” he said. “EVs are one of the ways in which the UK strives for a greener future and we’re pleased to help drive this goal forward with what we believe is the UK’s biggest roll-out of rapid charging points to date.”

The move from Premier Inn has attracted praise from the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS), which is currently juggling the challenges of the net-zero transition and the UK’s economic recovery from the Covid-19 pandemic. The hospitality sector is widely regarded as one of the most affected in the country by lockdown restrictions.

BEIS Minister Kwasi Kwarteng said: “Just as the Government is accelerating efforts to support EV and battery manufacturing in the UK, we must also ensure the public can access high-power charging points at their convenience.

“This fantastic initiative between two great companies will allow for stress-free electric vehicle charging when we are able to visit our favourite pubs and restaurants again – allowing consumers to charge up in record time while encouraging others to make that all-important switch to electric.”

To communicate the new EV charging commitment with customers in the current landscape, Premier Inn is changing its electrified moon logo and signage to “Plugged Inn” at several of its major sites.

Force For Good

Whitbread’s broader ‘Force For Good’ sustainability strategy was updated to include new environmental targets in 2020.

The business is aiming to halve its carbon emissions intensity by 2025, against a 2018/19 baseline, and to deliver an 84% reduction by 2050. It claims that these moves will align the firm with the UK’s 2050 net-zero target.

Setting new targets in this space appears to be the exception, rather than the norm, for the UK hospitality sector. Of the sustainability and energy professionals in this sector that answered edie’s Green Recovery Survey questions, two-thirds said they had to delay or cancel sustainability-related announcements as a result of Covid-19. Moreover, more than half (52%) of hospitality and leisure respondents had placed sustainability or energy staff onto the Government’s furlough scheme, while 29% had to make staff in those functions redundant.

Sarah George

News

Mission Possible Partnership: Hundreds of transport and industrial businesses form climate coalition

Some 400 heavy emitters from the transport and industrial sectors have formed a new collaborative partnership aimed at accelerating the low-carbon transition, with financial backing from Amazon’s Jeff Bezos.

The sectors represented by the new Partnership collectively represent 30% of global annual emissions

The sectors represented by the new Partnership collectively represent 30% of global annual emissions

Editor’s note: The Mission Possible Partnership bears no relation to edie’s Mission Possible campaign. That campaign is still ongoing and you can find out more about it, here.

The Mission Possible Partnership’s ambition is to “accelerate several pathways for decarbonising heavy industry and transport by unifying the critical actors needed to influence and enable industry transformation at speed and scale.”

Member businesses, supported financially by the Bezos Earth Fund and Breakthrough Energy, will collaborate to invest and lobby in ways that help scale up the markets for emerging technologies that will help to decarbonise sectors like shipping, aviation, chemicals, cement and steel. The aim is to demonstrate net-zero emission “breakthrough” innovations this year. All transport firms signed up to the partnership will need to produce complete climate action plans within three years if they don’t already have such frameworks in place.

Airbus, BASF, Boeing, Cargill, easyJet, Heathrow Airport, Royal DSM, Royal Dutch Shell and Volvo are among the first corporate members of the Partnership. The financial sector is also represented through members including Citi and Lloyds Register.

Management duties for the Partnership, meanwhile, will be shared by the Energy Transitions Commission, Rocky Mountain Institute, We Mean Business Coalition and World Economic Forum (WEF). The formation of the Partnership was announced to coincide with the WEF’s original dates for its meeting in Davos, which has been postponed and relocated due to Covid-19.

The Rocky Mountain Institute’s managing director Paul Bodnar said that the sectors represented by the new Partnership, which rolls several pre-existing industry-led decarbonisation partnerships into one, collectively represent 30% of global annual emissions. Yet many of them are excluded from the ways in which nations account for their emissions and Paris Agreement contributions. International shipping and aviation, for example, are not counted by the UK.

“The Paris Agreement was a leap forward in organizing the work of nations on climate but hitting 1.5C also requires a strategy that speaks the language of global industries, which transcend borders in their supply chains, markets, and investors,” Bodnar said. “The Mission Possible Partnership has developed an approach to help entire industrial ecosystems define and organise their journey to net zero emissions.”

Pre-existing coalitions brought together by the Partnership include the shipping sector’s Getting to Zero Coalition, the aviation sector’s Clean Skies for Tomorrow Group, the Climate Group’s Net Zero Steel initiative and the Road Freight Net Zero Coalition. Altogether, some 400 firms are represented by the new initiative.

Sectors off-track

The industries represented by the new Partnership contribute significantly to global annual emissions and, as such, will be crucial to the delivery of net-zero ambitions.

But a study from the Transition Pathway Initiative (TPI) last year found that many of the largest transport and industrial firms need to increase their ambitions and accelerate action in terms of decarbonisation. Its analysis found that 80% of the highest-emitting listed companies are failing to deliver emissions reductions aligned to the Paris Agreement’s 2C  – let alone the 1.5C limit highlighted by the IPCC.

High-carbon sectors will undoubtedly have to prove that they have their own hoses in order ahead of the COP26 event in November, widely regarded as the most important UN COP since the Paris Agreement was ratified in 2015.

With this in mind, the Mission Possible Partnership is working with the Race To Zero campaign, orchestrated by the UN and COP26 co-hosts Italy and the UK. Race to Zero was set up to inspire a holistic and ambitious approach to the global net-zero transition.

“As we move into the decade of delivery, we must not only grow the number of actors committed to a resilient, zero-carbon future, we must foster the radical collaboration needed to drive transformational change in every sector of the economy,” the UK’s high-level champion for COP26 Nigel Topping said. Topping is notably the former leader of the We Mean Business Coalition.


edie’s next online masterclass to focus on industrial energy efficiency

Readers interested in the ole that energy efficiency will play on the road to net-zero for industrial business are encouraged to register for edie’s next free online masterclass on this important topic. 

The 45-minute session will air at 1pm (GMT) on 10 March, and is being hosted in association with Carbon Trust and the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS).

For full details and to register, click here. 


Sarah George

News

Mastercard commits to net-zero carbon by 2050

Mastercard has pledged to reach net-zero emissions by 2050, aiming to expand the use of onsite solar technology while also decarbonising its supply chain.

The company will also aim to tackle emissions from the supply chain, which accounts for more than 70% of Mastercard’s total carbon footprint

The company will also aim to tackle emissions from the supply chain, which accounts for more than 70% of Mastercard’s total carbon footprint

Mastercard is the latest corporate to raise the ambitions of its decarbonisation strategy, pledging to reach net-zero emissions by 2050.

The move builds on current commitments aligned with its Business Ambition for 1.5°C pledge that has seen Mastercard work towards SBTi-approved goal to reduce total Scope 1 and 2 emissions by 38% and Scope 3 emissions by 20% by 2025 from a 2016 baseline. 

While Mastercard achieved 100% renewable energy offset usage across all of its global offices in 2017, and has joined the RE100, the new commitment will see the company ramp up renewable energy programmes.

Mastercard, which operates close to 180 facilities globally, will expand the use of solar panels in data centres, which account for more than 50% of energy usage for the company. It will build on strong progress to date, which has seen all Mastercard-owned properties in the US fitted with solar panels.

The company will also aim to tackle emissions from the supply chain, which accounts for more than 70% of Mastercard’s total carbon footprint. Mastercard has also hinted that it will invest in carbon removal projects, including nature-based solutions and technologies and services that reduce carbon.

Mastercard’s chief sustainability officer Kristina Kloberdanz said: “2021 is set to be a crucial year for climate action, and we believe the private sector has a vital role to play in the transition to a zero-carbon economy. The quality of all our futures are deeply and inextricably linked to the health and well-being of our planet.

“That’s why, in addition to improving our own environmental footprint, we’re driving systemic change through powerful coalitions and empowering our network of nearly 3-billion consumers to take collective action to preserve the environment. By coming together, we can drive exponential impact.”

Last year, edie spoke to Kloberdanz as part of our ongoing #SustyTalk series. In the video interview, Kloberdanz discusses Mastercard’s work to promote credit cards made using recycled and bio-based materials, as well as the recent expansion of its Priceless Planet Coalition. The Coalition links loyalty schemes to tree planting initiatives from Conservation International and the World Resources Institute (WRI) and is targeting 100 million trees by 2025

She also provides best-practice advice for professionals looking to forge new partnerships to tackle key environmental and social issues, and to improve communication and collaboration across and beyond their respective sectors. Watch the interview here.

Mastercard is also part of the “Business Avengers”. The coalition of 17 global corporates – including Unilever, Nike and Google – worth more than $500bn in revenue was launched to highlight how businesses can amplify actions to help hit the targets of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

The Business Avengers is represented by corporates with more than 90,000 employees collectively. The coalition will work to highlight the role that businesses can play in achieving the SDGs by 2030.

Matt Mace

News

edie’s next online masterclass to focus on industrial energy efficiency

edie’s next online masterclass has been confirmed for Wednesday 10 March and will explore the role that energy efficiency will play on the road to net-zero for industrial business.

The masterclass will be available to watch on-demand for those who have registered. Image: Carbon Trust

The masterclass will be available to watch on-demand for those who have registered. Image: Carbon Trust

The 45-minute session will air at 1pm (GMT) on 10 March, and is being hosted in association with Carbon Trust and the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS).

—CLICK HERE TO REGISTER FOR THE MASTERCLASS—

With industry responsible for around a fifth of UK greenhouse gas emissions, the deployment of innovative energy efficiency technologies and systems is critical to improving the energy intensity of industrial processes.

Therefore, this session will break down how these technological innovations can be utilised to enhance your energy efficiency approach and decarbonise industrial processes. The session will include two expert presenters and a live audience Q&A.

The masterclass is supported by the Carbon Trust, which is managing the BEIS Industrial Energy Efficiency Accelerator (IEEA) – a programme which assists partnerships between developers of innovative energy efficient technologies and industrial companies, by funding the demonstration of those technologies on-site.

Discussion points:

  • Developing cutting-edge innovation to improve the energy efficiency of industrial processes
  • Identifying which energy efficiency technologies are right for you
  • How Government-industry partnerships can support carbon reduction programmes

Masterclass chair:

Sarah George, Senior Reporter, edie

Masterclass presenters and speakers:

Sarah Jolliffe, Carbon Reduction Lead, BAM Nuttall

Sarah is the Carbon Reduction Lead at BAM Nuttall – an operating division of Royal BAM group which is a large multi-national construction firm undertaking large civil engineering projects across the globe. Sarah started her career as a trade operative with a small house builder before moving into a site engineering role where she completed a HND in civil engineering. She then progressed into an environmental adviser role for the Crossrail project after which she took her current position as energy manager looking after all of BAM’s interests with regards to sustainability. She has successfully completed Levels 1 and 2 of the energy institutes energy management courses and has picked up several awards and short-listings recently including Highly commended Energy Champion, Energy Manager Finalist and 2 further shortlistings for the women in engineering in 2019 and 2020. Besides her technical competencies, she is also a passionate diversity and inclusion ambassador helping to break down bias and championing equality throughout her day to day activities. This also extends to her participation as a STEM ambassador in which she engages with young people to stimulate interest in STEM industries.

Paul McKinney, Programme Manager – BEIS IEEA, The Carbon Trust

Additional presenters/speakers TBC

—CLICK HERE TO REGISTER FOR THE MASTERCLASS—

edie Staff

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