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July 2021

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Energy Prices

Ministers plan to extend the price cap on energy bills beyond 2023 and test automatic tariff switching to help stop consumers being ripped off. Auto-switching is an attempt to boost competition in the energy market and save consumers overpaying on “rip-off” tariffs. However, the plans have been opposed by the industry, which warned they were “stuck in the past” and risked damaging efforts to go green. Kwasi Kwarteng, the Business Secretary, said: “We want to unleash a wave of competition within the energy market and keep energy bills low so households across the UK can keep more money in their back pockets.”

Telegraph 23rd July 2021 read more »

The energy industry is bracing for a new wave of small supplier failures amid warnings that many cannot survive soaring wholesale gas and electricity prices. Keith Anderson, chief executive of ScottishPower, one of Britain’s biggest suppliers, said: “A massive train crash is about to happen because their models are unsustainable. Prices have gone through the roof and they can’t cope.” Wholesale UK gas prices are close to their highest levels since 2005 and are more than six times higher than they were a year ago, according to ICIS, the price reporting agency, while power prices have tripled in a year to 13-year highs. Anderson said that many small suppliers had signed customers to cheap, fixed-price deals and were now having to buy wholesale energy “way, way above what they are selling it at”. Such suppliers sought to keep signing up customers to bring in enough cash to survive, but “prices have gone up so much in the wholesale market, it’s impossible to run fast enough to catch up.

Times 24th July 2021 read more »

News

EU’s green hydrogen plans hailed as ‘true game-changer’ by industry

The European Commission boosted regulatory support for green hydrogen in its proposed overhaul of climate legislation published last week, with the renewable hydrogen coalition calling it “a true game changer” for the nascent EU industry.

Reaching the EU’s 2030 climate goal will require a significant build-up in the production of renewable electricity, which is needed to feed the electrolysers generating green hydrogen

Reaching the EU’s 2030 climate goal will require a significant build-up in the production of renewable electricity, which is needed to feed the electrolysers generating green hydrogen

As part of its ‘Fit for 55’ package of climate legislation, named after the 55% greenhouse gas emissions reduction it aims to achieve by 2030, the European Commission put forward several ways of boosting the use of renewable hydrogen.

“Hydrogen must provide an alternative to fossil fuels, so today we are proposing a definition for renewable hydrogen, which makes it possible to have a viable certification system,” said energy commissioner Kadri Simson at a press conference on Wednesday (14 July).

As part of the plans, the European Commission proposed a 50% target for “renewable fuels of non-biological origins” – essentially green hydrogen – in the share of hydrogen fuels used in European industry by 2030, whether as a feedstock or in final energy consumption.

That is “a true game-changer,” according to the Renewable Hydrogen Coalition, an industry group bringing together electricity companies such as Enel, Iberdrola and Orsted as well as wind industry giants like Vestas and Siemens Gamesa.

“Such a target can clearly help boost the share of renewable hydrogen in the European hydrogen market – currently 96% fossil-gas based – and drive its cost down, making it competitive with fossil-based alternatives,” said François Paquet from the coalition.

Green hydrogen targets for transport and industry

However, reaching the EU’s 2030 climate goal will require a significant build-up in the production of renewable electricity, which is needed to feed the electrolysers generating green hydrogen, Paquet said.

And incentives will be needed to enable the use of green hydrogen in heavy industry and in long distance transport, the industry said.

The package indeed contained other objectives, like a 2.6% target for “renewable fuels of non-biological origin” used in transport, and more refuelling stations for hydrogen vehicles.

Those were welcomed by industry body Hydrogen Europe, which said the new objectives will give a significant boost to the EU’s nascent hydrogen economy.

“By putting targets on the use of hydrogen in industry and transport, the EU stands a real chance to achieve climate objectives, create thousands of jobs and protect its industry,” said Jorgo Chatzimarkakis, secretary general of Hydrogen Europe.

But setting targets is not enough to enable a switch to renewable hydrogen, Paquet warned.

“Any target must be accompanied by dedicated support instruments towards renewable hydrogen to make it an economically feasible option and keep them competitive,” he said.

That includes reducing taxation rates for renewable electricity and supporting so-called carbon contracts for difference – or state aid agreements where governments close the gap between the carbon price on the EU market and the CO2 price that would be needed to make green hydrogen competitive.

NGOs denounce flawed plans

However, not everyone was pleased with the Commission’s plan.

Transport and Environment, a green mobility NGO, has warned that the focus on hydrogen risks promoting their use in the automotive sector, where electrification is more efficient.

And Global Witness, another environmental NGO, expressed concern that the European Commission had undermined climate ambition by promoting “low-carbon” hydrogen in parts of its ‘Fits for 55’ package.

“It would have been absurd to allow fossil fuels to be labelled as ‘renewable energy’,” Global Witness said, hailing the Commission’s decision to exclude ‘low-carbon’ hydrogen from the renewable energy directive.

However, it warned about moves to promote ‘low-carbon’ hydrogen in other parts of the package. ‘Low-carbon’ hydrogen is obtained from fossil gas but disposes the related CO2 emissions using a process known as carbon capture and storage (CCS).

“What the Commission took away from industry with one hand it gave back with the other. This has resulted in a contradictory hydrogen policy that will only be further exploited by fierce lobbying from the gas industry,” said Tara Conolly, senior gas campaigner at Global Witness.

The European Commission made it clear though that both renewable and low-carbon hydrogen will be needed in order to grow the hydrogen market in the coming years.

“There are sectors where direct electrification is not the solution, where we need other alternatives, and hydrogen is the obvious alternative. That’s why we will promote hydrogen production here in Europe and also uptake in different sectors, mainly in industry and transport,” Simson said.

To achieve our 2030 targets, “we will need also low-carbon hydrogen, not only renewables,” she added.

Kira Taylor, EurActiv.com

This article first appeared on EurActiv.com, an edie content partner

News

Pension schemes urged to set net-zero targets ahead of COP26

More than 80 defined benefit (DB) pension schemes have been urged to align with the Paris Agreement by aiming to reach net-zero emissions by 2050 at the latest while also ensuring a rapid exit from coal investments.

Make My Money Matter calls on the pension schemes to match the 1.5C ambition of the Paris Agreement

Make My Money Matter calls on the pension schemes to match the 1.5C ambition of the Paris Agreement

Ricard Curtis’s Make My Money Matter campaign has this week written to more than 80 DB pension schemes, including those associated with Exxon, Vodafone, BP, Barclays and the BBC.

The letter outlines that these schemes do not yet have targets in place to align with the net-zero movement, which would include a commitment to halving emissions by 2030. Make My Money Matter is calling on the DB pensions to follow the likes of BT’s pension scheme by committing to net-zero ahead of COP26 in November.

Make My Money Matter calls on the pension schemes to match the 1.5C ambition of the Paris Agreement and commit to delivering a rapid exit from all coal investments.

The organisation’s chief executive Tony Burdon said: “After reaching out to DC master trusts last month, we are broadening our focus to include the DB sector, which accounts for the large majority of the UK’s £2.6trn pension industry. These schemes have extraordinary power to help tackle the climate crisis and protect savers’ investments, but many have yet to respond to growing demand for cleaner, greener pensions. To meet the 1.5C ambition of the Paris Climate Agreement and tackle the climate emergency, we need our finance industry to move fast. Pensions are a crucial part of this and, with £2.6trn circulating in the UK sector alone, it is vital that no stone is left unturned.

“This is why we need all DB schemes to use their enormous pension power to tackle the climate crisis, and urgently reduce emissions. We know that this approach is good for the planet, protects investments from climate risks and is in line with public demand. That’s why now is the moment for all pension schemes to commit to robust net-zero targets, and ensure our pensions are building a world worth retiring into.”

The letter follows on from the creation of Make My Money Matter’s ‘Green Pension Charter’, convened in partnership with community coalition Count Us In. Signatories to the charter include EY, Ikea, BrewDog, Ramboll UK, Ella’s Kitchen and Triodos Bank.

The Charter commits signatories to ensure that their pension schemes are “not investing in industries that harm our planet” by the time that COP26 takes place this November. Make My Money Matter’s primary focus is on fossil fuel divestment, but the Charter also covers businesses in other sectors with high environmental impact. For example, mining and extractives firms with no clear transition plans would be excluded under the Charter’s definition.

Transition plans, the Charter states, should clearly outline how projects receiving finance will align with net-zero by 2050 at the latest.

The aim of the Charter, beyond accelerating action and increasing ambition among the 50 first signatories, is to encourage a wider shift across the pensions sector. Since it launched last year, Make My Money Matter has urged individuals and businesses to press their pension schemes to improve climate commitments and enhance emissions disclosure, leading to new pledges from the likes of Smart Pension and Brunel Pensions Partnership.

Matt Mace

News

Global Renewables

Some 960GW of new solar PV and wind capacity must be deployed globally each year by 2030 to be on track to reach net zero by mid-century, according to new analysis from BloombergNEF (BNEF). Those deployment projections form part of the research organisation’s latest New Energy Outlook report that details three paths (Green, Red and Gray) for the world to achieve net zero while relying on a different mix of technologies. Alongside the renewables ramp up, the Green scenario, which prioritises clean electricity and green hydrogen, will require the annual addition of 245GWh of batteries and 35 million electric vehicles by 2030, while 70%, or 1,417GW, of global coal-fired capacity will need to be retired.

Current 22nd July 2021 read more »

BloombergNEF has published its latest New Energy Outlook report, examining three progress pathways to reach net-zero globally by 2050. Here, edie summaries what will need to change to deliver this low-carbon trajectory. The red scenario prioritises nuclear and sees more than 7,000GW of new capacity added by 2050 – about a 19 times increase on current levels. The report also breaks down how much additional capacity of clean technology solutions will be needed to reach net-zero by 2050. According to the analysis, 505GW of additional wind power needs to be added annually through to 2030 – more than five times the current capacity levels for 2020. Alongside wind, 455GW of solar PV is needed annually, which is more than three times the current total. To deal with the intermittency of renewables, around 245GWh of battery storage will be required annually. This is 26 times greater than current levels. Decarbonising transport will require 35 million electric vehicles (EVs) added to the roads each year – 11 times greater than current levels – while sustainable aviation fuels will need to account for 18% of aircraft fuel by 2030. For heat, 18 million heat pumps should be installed annually, while increasing electricity use for low-temperature heating requirements in industry by 78% should also be prioritised.

Edie 22nd July 2021 read more »

News

How the world can reach net-zero emissions by 2050, according to BloombergNEF

BloombergNEF has published its latest New Energy Outlook report, examining three progress pathways to reach net-zero globally by 2050. Here, edie summaries what will need to change to deliver this low-carbon trajectory.

edie summarises how the world can reach net-zero emissions by 2050, according to BNEF

edie summarises how the world can reach net-zero emissions by 2050, according to BNEF

The global transition to net-zero emissions is a daunting and disruptive task, but one that is filled with opportunities provided nations move quickly enough. Some research suggests that the world could “technically and economically” transition to net-zero by 2050 for the cost of less than 1% of global GDP annually through to mid-century.

While 2050 is a little under 30 years away, the world is in a race against time to set up the mechanisms designed to reach net-zero. Every year of inaction adds to the bill of reaching net-zero.

According to BNEF’s latest New Energy Outlook report, the costs of reaching net-zero globally by 2050 would range between $92trn trillion and $173trn over the next thirty years. This is largely dependent on a range of different scenarios – labelled green, red and gray by BNEF – that all achieve net-zero through a different mixture of technologies and solutions.

“The capital expenditures needed to achieve net-zero will create enormous opportunities for investors, financial institutions and the private sector, while creating many new jobs in the green economy,” BNEF’s chief executive Jon Moore said.

With BNEF estimates stating that annual investments into global decarbonisation efforts will need to more than double – rising from $1.7trn currently to between $3.1trn and $5.8trn – a range of solutions are primed to help deliver the transition.

Here, edie summarises how the world can reach net-zero emissions by 2050, according to BNEF.

BNEF’s analysis is based on sectoral emissions budgets that outline how different parts of the economy need to decarbonise by 2050. The analysis suggests that global energy-related emissions need to fall 30% below 2019 levels by 2030, and 75% by 2040, to reach net-zero in 2050. This, according to BNEF, accounts for a 1.75C budget for global emissions and would require a 3.2% reduction annually to 2030. In contrast, emissions have risen globally by almost 1% annually from 2015 to 2020.

The report notes that the power sector needs to decarbonise at the highest pace over the next decade, reducing emissions by 57% compared to 2019 levels and then by 89% by 2040. BNEF notes that this can be delivered by renewable energy and electrification, by that clean hydrogen, carbon capture solutions and modular nuclear plants can all play a key role in helping other sectors decarbonise.

Road transport emissions, for example, need to be reduced by 11% by 2030 and then by 80% by 2040 compared to a 2019 baseline. A 14% reduction in emissions can be achieved by utilising electricity across transport and by providing low-carbon heat for buildings and industry.

The circular economy also has a role to play. Increase the efficiency and recycling levels of steel, aluminum and plastics can account for a 2% drop in emissions. This, however, would require an increase in the recycled volume of aluminum by 67%, steel 44% and plastics 149% by 2030 from 2019 levels.

Better building efficiency and growth of bioenergy for sustainable aviation fuel and shipping can deliver emissions reductions of 0.5% and 2% respectively.

BENF notes that “commercially available abatement technologies” will need to be deployed in each sector to reach net-zero by 2050. Under a “gray” scenario where coal and gas is used and fossil fuels account for 52% of primary energy in 2050, carbon capture and storage captures more than 174 gigatons of carbon dioxide by 2050. The green and red scenarios see demand for fossil fuels reach zero by 2050, replaced by renewables, electricity and hydrogen.

The red scenario prioritises nuclear and sees more than 7,000GW of new capacity added by 2050 – about a 19 times increase on current levels.

Gigawatts needed

The report also breaks down how much additional capacity of clean technology solutions will be needed to reach net-zero by 2050.

According to the analysis, 505GW of additional wind power needs to be added annually through to 2030 – more than five times the current capacity levels for 2020. Alongside wind, 455GW of solar PV is needed annually, which is more than three times the current total.

To deal with the intermittency of renewables, around 245GWh of battery storage will be required annually. This is 26 times greater than current levels.

Decarbonising transport will require 35 million electric vehicles (EVs) added to the roads each year – 11 times greater than current levels – while sustainable aviation fuels will need to account for 18% of aircraft fuel by 2030.

For heat, 18 million heat pumps should be installed annually, while increasing electricity use for low-temperature heating requirements in industry by 78% should also be prioritised.

New demand for hydrogen in 2050 varies based on the scenarios. In the gray scenario, there are 190 million tonnes of hydrogen produces, compared to 1,318 million tonnes under the green scenario. For the green scenario, hydrogen accounts for 22% of total energy consumption, compared with around 0.002% today.

With many parts of the world still relying on fossil fuels for crucial access to power, BNEF states that coal-fired power generation needs to fall by 72% by 2030, with around 70% of plants – with a capacity of more than 1,400GW – retired in the same timeframe.

Matt Mace

News

Ecotricity/Good Energy

Ecotricity Group has made a formal offer for the shares in rival Good Energy Group it does not already own. The cash offer, which values Good Energy at £59.5m, follows the target company’s “unequivocal rejection” of a possible bid from Ecotricity. Under the terms of the offer, Good Energy Shareholders will be entitled to receive 340 pence in cash for each share they hold. When a possible bid at that amount was initially mooted by Ecotricity, the Good Energy board described it as “highly opportunistic”. Ecotricity said the offer was at a premium of approximately 10.6 per cent over the closing price of Good Energy share on the day before its interest became publicly known. Currently holding a stake of approximately 25.1 per cent in Good Energy, Ecotricity, which is led by founder Dale Vince, said at the start of July that it had made three non-binding indicative offers, all of which were rejected. Zeus Capital is acting as financial adviser to Ecotricity.

Insider Media 22nd July 2021 read more »

News

Construction Leadership Council plots path to net-zero

The Construction Leadership Council (CLC), which is co-chaired by Minister for Business and Industry, Department for Business, Energy, and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) Anne-Marie Trevelyan, has outlined plans to help the sector reach net-zero emissions as part of the wider national target.

By 2035, the CLC will have reduced construction product emissions by 66% from 2018 levels

By 2035, the CLC will have reduced construction product emissions by 66% from 2018 levels

The CLC has published a Construct Zero Performance Framework, following consultation with industry, with more than 2,500 comments received to shape the framework.

It outlines measures to accelerate domestic retrofitting, moving away from diesel generators and reduce energy from production as methods to help the sector reach net-zero.

CLC’s co-chair Andy Mitchell said: “We are seeing huge demand from across the sector to push forward towards Net Zero, and this has been reflected in the level of consultation feedback we received when we tested these metrics with industry.

“We can have confidence that these measures will help guide us towards a lower carbon future, and I look forward to seeing progress”.

The new framework has numerous targets with different deadlines, all of which are designed to help reach net-zero emissions. By 2035, for example, 78% of diesel plants are to be eliminated from construction sites.

From 2025, planning applications from the sector must connect to public transport and included electric vehicle (EV) charging if parking is provided. All new buildings will be designed with low-carbon heating solutions by the same deadline. Also by 2025, new homes and buildings will minimise energy demand and reduce emissions in operation by 75% for dwellings and 27% for commercial buildings compared to today’s levels.

The CLC will also work with Government to deliver retrofitting to 27 million homes by 2040.

The Council will also offer the chance for clients to become net-zero by offering new design options by 2022 and by 2035, the CLC will have reduced construction product emissions by 66% from 2018 levels.

The CLC will also encourage 1,500 businesses across the construction industry to sign up to relevant coalitions and movements, include Race to Zero and the Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi) by 2025.

Construction Minister Anne-Marie Trevelyan said: “The Performance Framework provides Government and Industry with a sector-level dashboard on progress towards net zero, aimed at enabling businesses to action progress and encouraging those outside the sector to take the key steps on the broader journey to net-zero.

“It’s important that the sector holds itself to account for the commitments it has made; the Performance Framework will enable the industry to do this, reporting progress on a quarterly basis, building on existing publicly available data.”


Mission Possible: Achieving a green recovery for the built environment

edie’s Mission Possible campaign has evolved to focus on the green recovery, with a new series of reports outlining the challenges that businesses in key sectors face in relation to the coronavirus pandemic, and the opportunities that the green recovery will bring. 

One of the sectors highlighted is the built environment. The Mission Possible: Green Recovery report for this sector is supported by E.ON and features an exclusive viewpoint from UK Research and Innovation. It outlines and analyses the results of edie’s green recovery survey of 243 sustainability and energy professionals and also summarises in-depth discussions with a steering panel of sustainability experts from some of the world’s most respected construction and built environment firms in the vanguard of sustainability leadership.

Click here to download the free Mission Possible report. 

Matt Mace

News

V2X

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) has today (June 20) issued a call for evidence to better understand the role of vehicle-to-x (V2X) technologies in the transition to net zero. V2X is an umbrella term for technologies that allow an electric vehicle (EV) to export the energy in its battery for another use, including vehicle-to-grid, vehicle-to-home and vehicle-to-business. Although V2X has been technically feasible for over a decade, the challenge has been to realise a viable commercial model, according to the call for evidence.

Current 20th July 2021 read more »

Drivers would be able to sell power stored on their electric vehicle batteries back to the grid under plans to shore up Britain’s energy supply. Ministers are exploring an idea to allow the grid to suck power out of electric car batteries at times of high demand. Motorists could earn up to £436 annually from the scheme, on top of savings from so-called “smart charging”, research cited by officials suggests. The Government said the 15m electric vehicles on the road by 2030 could be “a major source of flexibility” to help meet the country’s soaring electricity needs from the net zero transition. This would allow electric cars to export the energy in the battery to supply a home, a business or the electricity grid. Trials are being held across the world to help make the technology viable for mass use. Officials called the potential benefits to the energy system “very promising” but noted it could worsen green motorists’ “range anxiety”, whereby drivers worry they cannot use their electric vehicle when they want. The RAC estimates that a car is used just 4pc of the time, meaning their batteries would be available to power homes when demand peaks.

Telegraph 20th July 2021 read more »

News

Net-zero pubs and bars scheme to help UK sector accelerate climate action amid Covid-19 recovery

A new industry protocol and certification standard has been launched to help the UK’s bars and pubs reach net-zero before the national legal deadline of 2050.

Pictured: Panellists at the initiative's launch event at The Culpeper, Shoreditch, one of the 36 pilot locations. Image: Net-Zero Now

Pictured: Panellists at the initiative’s launch event at The Culpeper, Shoreditch, one of the 36 pilot locations. Image: Net-Zero Now

Convened by Net-Zero Now, the Net-Zero Pubs and Bars Initiative has been launched today (20 July) following a pilot at 36 sites across the UK. It is being delivered in association with beverage supplier giants Coca-Cola Europacific Partners (CCEP) and Pernod Ricard.

Of the managers of the 36 pilot sites, 85% said they needed more help and guidance in accelerating decarbonisation and then dealing with residual emissions in line with net-zero – particularly in light of the financial squeeze facing the UK’s hospitality sector post-lockdown.

With that in mind, the initiative offers a digital platform enabling pubs and bars to calculate their emissions, set ambitious reduction targets and develop tailored plans for delivery. From there, businesses can seek certification. Net Zero Now will charge pubs and bars £490 per site, per year, for this service.

Speaking about the business case for participating in the Initiative at the launch event, held at The Culpeper in Shoreditch, Net-Zero Now’s chief executive Simon Heppner said: “One of the things we’ve learned is this is a sector with a big impact and small margins. If we could have chosen a more difficult sector, I don’t know what that would be. This is a sector where the climate impact is big and so the potential conversion cost is high and margins are low. Going net-zero will be really hard for this sector [compared to, for example, offices].

“I’m not trying to say it won’t be done… it’s incredibly resonant and powerful and people want to do it. That’s why working with partners is so important; it allows us to have that ongoing conversation and that reach across the sector… and, potentially, to provide the motivation – I choose that word carefully.

“[Transitioning to net-zero] has got to be the only sensible commercial decision and, without the Government leading on that through subsidies and taxes, we’re looking to industry leaders.”

Panellists joined Heppner in emphasising that many of the actions recommended by the Initiative are either cost-neutral or cost-saving. For example, only one-quarter of the pilot locations had switched to a renewable electricity tariff prior to participating, while none were routinely switching off fridges used to house wines overnight. Other recommended actions include switching to LED lighting and turning down thermostats.

Moreover, beyond the reduction piece, Net Zero Now has estimated that the cost of offsetting residual and lifetime emissions will only be around 1-7p per cover, while pilot participants had expected the price range to be 50p to £5. Offsets are curated by UK Hospitality and will support UK-based projects involving sustainable agriculture, reforestation and improving soil carbon sequestration – “things the sector cares about”, according to Heppner.

CCEP’s head of climate and sustainability Nick Brown added: “We really see our role as getting some of those messages out there…. That [the process is] probably not as expensive or cumbersome as you may imagine, and whatever you can do now will put you in a better position for continuing to engage with policy changes and changes in customer expectations in the next few years.”

Additionally floated was the idea that setting a net-zero commitment could help pubs hire and retain staff, with the notion that under-30s are becoming increasingly sustainability-minded. According to the Office for National Statistics, some 100,000 vacancies were posted in the sector between April and June. 

Food for thought

This isn’t to say that pubs and bars will not need to take actions that will prove more time-consuming and expensive. For instance, food-led pubs report that 70% of their overall emissions footprint is associated with food, chiefly through embedded carbon and from cooking using gas.

However, the Initiative will encourage pubs and bars to choose when and how they will make more major investments or changes to processes and supply chains, the panel explained at the launch event.

“Given the state that everyone’s in post-pandemic… you might look at the action plan and say you can only tackle the cost-saving steps in the next six months,” summarised the Sustainable Restaurants Association’s (SRA) managing director Juliane Caillouette Noble.

Moreover, it was emphasised that pubs and bars should continue to champion choice for the consumer and to engage visitors with the net-zero transition. One move, for example, that could reduce a site’s annual emissions footprint by more than 19 tonnes, would be switching half of the dairy products to alternatives.

Broader engagement

As the launch event continued, conversation turned to the importance of engaging the pubs and bars sectors on net-zero at this unique moment in time, with COP26 less than four months away and with the challenge of financially recovering from Covid-19 being front of mind.

The SRA’s Noble described hospitality as a “showcase sector”, where conversations with a “doom and gloom message” on the environment could be changed, showcasing the co-benefits to staff, consumers and the local community.

The Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy’s net-zero business engagement lead Catherine Westoby added:  “It’s absolutely crucial that we get small businesses on board – especially ahead of COP26.

“Small businesses comprise more than 99% of all UK businesses and we absolutely can’t have business engagement which does not bring them on board… SMEs are embedded in local communities, on local high streets, with enormous consumer influence. There is the ability for this campaign to reach far and wide.”

Net-Zero Now’s Heppner agreed. He also emphasised the intention of inspiring the development of similar initiatives for other sectors and of initiatives for pubs and bars in other countries, calling COP26 a “shop window” for promotion.

The launch of the initiative comes after trade associations UK Hospitality and the British Beer and Pub Association launched the Zero Carbon Forum late last year. The Forum is convening restaurants, food-to-go outlets, pubs, bars and cafes to develop a roadmap to net-zero. Members include Shepherd Neame, Marston’s, Greene King and Young’s. 

Sarah George 

News

Solar Scotland

SNP ministers and the Scottish Greens were urged today to set a “stretching but achievable” target to massively increase Scotland’s capacity for solar power as part of formal power-sharing talks. Solar Energy Scotland argues that such a move could help boost the economy, saying that every gigawatt of new solar capacity creates 500 full-time equivalent jobs. The organisation has pressed the issue in a letter to both First Minister Nicola Sturgeon and the co-leaders of the Scottish Greens as the two parties are now in discussions on a possible formal co-operation agreement whereby Greens could join the Scottish Cabinet.

Morning Star 19th July 2021 read more »

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